Keeping in touch by blog!

Thank you for spending a few minutes and checking out my blog!

This is a great way for me to keep you informed about what's new at Oakdale Dental.  You'll find stories about todays dentistry and how it can make your life better and healthier, and sometimes some random thoughts I hope you find interesting. 

If you are already one of my patients, let me know what you think.  Any topics you would like to read about or questions you have, just send me an email.There is lots of information already on this site and my other practice website: Oakdale Dental! 

For those of you who I have not had the pleasure to meet yet, I'm glad to have here and feel free to drop by and pay us a visit at Oakdale Dental in beautiful Oakville.

So, come back once in a while...I try to post regularly and have some interesting things for you to check out and maybe a story or two to tell.


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"Great things start with a smile!" Dr Rosenblat

Thoughts for you, from my blog...

 

Entries in cavity (4)

Monday
Oct062014

If I Need a Crown...does that mean I need a root canal too?

In a word, no.

This is another one of those common questions I get asked all the time.  When I tell a patient who has a broken down tooth they need a crown to preserve, I am asked about root canal treatment before the crown. People are relieved to hear that a tooth does not need root canal treatment before "crowning" as long as the tooth isTheOakvilleDentist.com healthy.  Generally crowns are to repair broken down or weakend teeth. What gets people confused is that often, after a root canal, a crown is often recommended.  

What's the difference?  

Well root canal treatment results in a weakened tooth, one that can fracture sometimes resulting in tooth loss.  A crown or onlay after root canal will hold the tooth together and allow it to be used for chewing normally. Most of the time a tooth needs root canal treatment because it has either a large cavity or large filling that results in the tooth becoming infected. To treat the nerve in the tooth we end up weakening the tooth further. You may hear stories from people you know who say they had root canal and lost their tooth.  I'll bet 90% of the time it is because they didn't follow their dentists recommendation to crown the tooth afterwards, and it fractures as it it has become structurally weaker.

So now you know the difference.

Great things start with a smile!

Dr Steven Rosenblat

TheOakvilleDentist.com

Friday
Jun202014

New tooth decay technology could end drilling at the dentist’s office!

Wow! Have we reached the holy grail of dentistry?

As a practicing dentist for over 30 years I've seen a lot of exciting claims come and go. A lot of them do not live up the the hype.

So lets look at the latest thing to make drill free dentistry just around the corner. in a story I read in the Toronto Star this week ( and identically reported in many other news sources because it is a "press release") King’s College London Professor Dr Nigel Pitts has reportedly developed a method " using electrical currents to help drive minerals into the tooth" . So what does this mean?

A cavity is a "hole" in a tooth.  This results from the bacteria living in the mouth on the surfaces of teeth, consuming sugars we eat and producing acids that removes the minerals in the enamel and dentine of our teeth  ( demineralization). Our saliva naturally counteracts this as much as it is possible between meals doing a bit of remineralization of the enamel and dentine.  But this is easily overwhelmed by frequently consuming lots of sugary things. Natural remineralization only helps superficial damage to the tooth if there is a rest period between meals. ( So snacking inhibits this).

When the decay damages the tooth enough there is a hole significant enough that the dentist needs a drill to get to and remove the soft mushy stuff that is there- decayed tooth. This decayed tooth cannot be remineralized. it must be removed and replaced with a solid replacement called a "filling". Think rust on an old car. You cannot turn the rust back to steel.

So what it sounds like Dr Pitts is proposing is a faster way to deal with the most superficial enamel damage that we would never drill out in any case. It will involve, as the press release says; monitoring.  We call them check ups. The "growing demand for pain-free, effective solutions to cavities" exists already.  Reduce sugars in your diet, proper brushing and flossing and regular dental care.

As you will also note they have formed a company for this product whose research has not as yet even been published to raise money to develop this new product. That is why your read this "article" which is little more that a press release to generate interest.

So don't get too excited, I seriously doubt this will change anything very much.

Dr Steven Rosenblat

TheOakvilleDentist.com

Great things start with a smile!

Wednesday
May112011

"White" Fillings....

 The most common restoration or "filling" that dentists do today is a composite resin.  Most non dentists call them "white fillings"  The science of white fillings has evolved over the past 25 years to the point that they are now the most common restoration we dentists place in teeth.  They are esthetic and durable.   White composite filling.While the old silver metal fillings depended on corrosion to be sealed into the tooth ( really, I'm not kidding...), white fillings are bonded chemically and micro mechanically to the structure of  the tooth itself.  This helps strengthen the tooth.   The technique for placing a white filling is much more exacting and sensitive to technical errors than an old fashioned silver amalgam filling but it has gotten easier over the years and we have learned how to do it correctly.  The technology of "white fillings" is still evolving.  I was just at a seminar this past Friday where the newest "Nano filled" white fillings and bonding systems were reviewed and I'm anxious to try the latest and greatest!

Large cavity restored with composite filling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday
Dec152009

Decay to abcess...as seen in "X-Rays"

I thought I'd post an intersting animation I made a while back.   I occasionally make animations for educational purposes and you may have seen some on this or other websites I have had in the past.  If you are a patient who sees me at my Oakville practice, you have seen this and other dental education I play on the monitors in my office.
Here you can see a cavity start on a tooth that has no decay to start.  Just beside this tooth you can see two teeth with fillings...they look white.decay to abcess -Xray "movie"
As the decay progresses, it gets larger and deeper in a typical manner, eventually reaching the dark area in the center of the tooth.  This dark area in the center of the tooth is the "hollow" inside of the tooth where the "nerve" or dental pulp is.  The pulp is the living part of the tooth.  When the decay reaches the pulp, the bacteria that has caused the decay (destruction of the hard tooth structure) infects the pulp tissue and it dies.  The dead tissue breaks down and abcesses and on this Xray Animation you see a large round shadow form at root tip.  This dark spot is the breakdown or destruction of bone there by the abcessing nerve tissue. 
As you might guess,  I try to get the cavities when they are small and easy to repair.  Once the decay reaches the nerve, root canal therapy is needed and we want to avoid that.  This is one of the reasons we dentists take radiographs or "X-rays" at check ups... to get the cavities when they are small and easy to fix!