Keeping in touch by blog!

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This is a great way for me to keep you informed about what's new at Oakdale Dental.  You'll find stories about todays dentistry and how it can make your life better and healthier, and sometimes some random thoughts I hope you find interesting. 

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"Great things start with a smile!" Dr Rosenblat

Thoughts for you, from my blog...

 

Entries in gingivitis (5)

Thursday
Aug062015

Why we bug you to brush when you have braces...

Lots of kids are really good at keeping their teeth clean when they have braces and let me tell you it's not easy! But it is really worth the effort.  When food and dental plaque is not removed meticulously around braces the decay process starts.  Even if it does not progress to full cavities ( holes in the teeth) early decay makes the enamel white and blotchy where it is decalcifiying the enamel. This is the result of an acid attack- the bacteria in dental plaque produce acids that decalcify the enamel.  Where the metal brackets of the braces are attached to the teeth the enamel is undamaged so you get the typical look seen in here the photo.  Oh, and the gums react to the plaque too with fiery red inflammation and bleeding called Gingivitis.After spending the time and effort not to mention the cost to straighten teeth it can be heartbreaking to remove a child's braces and see what should be a perfect smile!

For this reason we highly recommend more frequent dental visits to help keep a childs teeth clean during orthodontic treatment

Dr Steven Rosenblat

Great things start with a smile!

TheOakvilleDentist.com

Wednesday
Jan252012

Gum disease, pyorrhea, periodontitis, a rose by any other name....

So what exactly is gum disease and can I explain it easily enough for anyone to understand?  I think so.

I'm sure you have heard of plaque and tartar.  It's mentioned in all the toothpaste ads.  Plaque is the soft stuff on your teeth that can come off with a toothbrush.  Tartar ( or what we dentists call "calculus"- not the math by the way) is the hard stuff you cannot brush off.  It's found above the gum line where you can see it and below where you cannot.  Tartar...to put it indelicately... has to be scrapped off.  We dentists call this "scaling".   Now bacteria live in the plaque and tartar.  They produce among other things toxins that break down the gum tissue attachment to the teeth and cause the bone that holds the teeth to shrink away.  As it becomes more severe, your teeth become loose and you if left untreated the affected teeth will be lost.  That in a nut shell is gum disease.  It is generally painless.  Bleeding swollen red gums are often seen.  Some times you cannot tell you suffer from it to look at your gums.

gum disease © Dr Steven Rosenblat

So how do we dentists know it's there? 

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Jul132011

How are women’s dental needs different than men’s?

 Good dental health is essential to good overall health.  Women face unique challenges in maintaining their dental health due to hormones and how they fluctuate during different stages of life and pregnancy.  These changes can make women more susceptible to gingivitis and gum disease.  And gum disease has been linked toA woman's dental health needs are different! an increased risk of problems including heart disease, preterm low birth weight babies and a woman’s ability to control conditions like diabetes.

How do a woman’s hormones affect gum disease?  Well basically it starts at puberty.  An increase in female sex hormones coincides with an increase in gingivitis (mild to severe) when a girl reaches puberty.  This is due to changes in the gum tissue, the response of the oral bacteria to those hormones (oral contraceptives too!) and the reaction of the gums to the irritation of plaque and debris as a result of these changes.  This is a common theme throughout a woman’s life as natural cycles cause changes in those hormones regularly.    “Canker sores” can often occur prior to a woman’s period as well.   During pregnancy the hormone changes can be much more exaggerated.  60-75% of pregnant woman have some gingivitis, some may be severe enough to cause pain, bleeding and even need minor surgical correction.  Later in life, menopause may also cause dry mouth, oral pain with red or inflamed gums and osteoporosis may worsen bone loss around teeth due to gum disease.

A healthy diet, good oral care at home and professional dental care can help minimize and treat these issues before they can become serious enough to cause tooth loss.

Remember, great things start with a smile!

 

Thursday
Oct072010

How are women’s dental needs different than men’s?

Good dental health is essential to good overall health.  Women face unique challenges in maintaining their dental health due to hormones and how they fluctuate during different stages of life and pregnancy.  These changes can make women more susceptible to gingivitis and gum disease.  And gum disease has been linked to an increased risk of problems including heart disease, preterm low birth weight babies and a woman’s ability to control conditions like diabetes.

How do a woman’s hormones affect gum disease?  Well basically it starts at puberty.  An increase in female sex hormones coincides with an increase in gingivitis (mild to severe) when a girl reaches puberty.  This is due to changes in the gum tissue, the response of the oral bacteria to those hormones (oral contraceptives too!) and the reaction of the gums to the irritation of plaque and debris as a result of these changes.  This is a common theme throughout a woman’s life as natural cycles cause changes in those hormones regularly.    “Canker sores” can often occur prior to a woman’s period as well.   During pregnancy the hormone changes can be much more exaggerated.  60-75% of pregnant woman have some gingivitis, some may be severe enough to cause pain, bleeding and even need minor surgical correction.  Later in life, menopause may also cause dry mouth, oral pain with red or inflamed gums and osteoporosis may worsen bone loss around teeth due to gum disease.

A healthy diet, good oral care at home and professional dental care can help minimize and treat these issues before they can become serious enough to cause tooth loss.

 

 

 

Tuesday
Sep012009

Why do my gums bleed?

Bleeding gums is a complaint we get quite often, so I thought that it may be a good time to talk about your gums.   While there are many reasons for gums or what we dentists call "gingiva" to bleed, the most common cause is people not cleaning their teeth (and gums) adequately.  Proper brushing and flossing will remove soft deposits on teeth called "dental plaque".  Plaque is a loaded with bacteria that will, if left on your teeth- cause cavities and irritate and inflame the gums.  This inflammation is called "gingivitis".  Your gums look red and puffy and bleed easily to touch.  That's why people often complain of bleeding when they brush their teeth. 

Click to read more ...