Keeping in touch by blog!

Thank you for spending a few minutes and checking out my blog!

This is a great way for me to keep you informed about what's new at Oakdale Dental.  You'll find stories about todays dentistry and how it can make your life better and healthier, and sometimes some random thoughts I hope you find interesting. 

If you are already one of my patients, let me know what you think.  Any topics you would like to read about or questions you have, just send me an email.There is lots of information already on this site and my other practice website: Oakdale Dental! 

For those of you who I have not had the pleasure to meet yet, I'm glad to have here and feel free to drop by and pay us a visit at Oakdale Dental in beautiful Oakville.

So, come back once in a while...I try to post regularly and have some interesting things for you to check out and maybe a story or two to tell.


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"Great things start with a smile!" Dr Rosenblat

Thoughts for you, from my blog...

 

Entries in xray (3)

Wednesday
Jun082016

Wisdom teeth...I could take 'em or leave 'em....

When a patient comes in to see me at my office in Oakville, with jaw pain, it is often necessary to take an "X-ray" or "radiograph"

The kind you see above is great because it shows all the teeth.  It is not detailed enough to diagnose cavities but I can see many pathologies and the developmental stages of the various teeth. This young lady is 15 and has no room for her wisdom teeth.  The teeth on the extreme right and left in the image are not in the mouth yet and you may notice the roots are not formed yet.  As they form the teeth try to come in to the mouth. Since there is no room, they are pressing on the teeth already there causing pain.  These are "impacted wisdom teeth". Now what is interesting here is where the arrow is pointing.  This is an abnormality that we found that doesn't hurt and I would never know was there unless we took the x-ray. While this mass may very well be benign, I have  referred her to have this evaluated and deal with it if need be. My oral surgeon will do that and remove the impacted wisdom teeth.

Now impacted wisdom teeth can often be painless, but if no, the symptoms can include; jaw pain, headaches, inability to open your mouth normally, swelling in the gums at the back of the mouth, as well as a bad odour or taste in the mouth.

So what happens if you leave a painless impacted wisdom tooth to sit quietly in the jaw.  Often nothing.  They may just sit there and cause no problems.  But if they are pressing against another tooth, they can cause the tooth they press against to start to disolve away and if bad enough, the wisdom tooth and the tooth it pushes on would be lost.  So sometimes if there is no room, wisdom teeth are removed proactively because of problems they can cause ( and if I see there is no room for them to come into the mouth).  It is also important to think long term too because it is easier to remove a wisdom tooth in a younger person since the bone is softer and healing is better in younger people.

Routine dental exams with x-rays can find things you never knew were there. Call us and we'll be glad to have a look around! 

Dr Steven Rosenblat

Great things start with a smile!  at TheOakvilleDentist.com

905 827-0301

 

Thursday
Oct202011

Why take X Rays of children?

Well I'm sure most of you know that dentists take radiographs or "xrays" to look for cavities.  And of course we can often see infections in the bone around teeth on xrays too.  But another reason to take xrays of children is to see if their adult teeth are present, developing normally and if they are in the correct location.

This young girl is 9 years old.  Her mom was missing some upper teeth that never formed but her daughter is missing lowers!  Lots going on here and it can be confusing to look at.  There are many teeth developing underneath baby teeth. The arrows show the area where there are two adult teeth missing.  They never developed.

panoramic xray of a 9 year oldIt is important to know if all permenant teeth are present in children so we know if the baby teeth are going to be replaced by adult teeth.  If not, do we need to plan braces (orthodontics) to move teeth to close the spaces where adult teeth should have been or should we work hard to keep the baby teeth for the long haul.  I've had patients who have been able to keep baby teeth well into their 30's and 40's.  But sometimes they cannot be kept that long.  If we can keep a baby tooth until past 18 years old, if it fails we can replace it with a dental implant and crown, just as if the adult tooth had developed!  But knowledge is the key, if we know early, we can plan.

Now most of you reading this are not dentists and not use to looking at xrays so below I made an animation to show you what it would look like if this young girl had the two teeth developing properly.  Watch closely and you will see the teeth that should have formed flashing on and off.

Missing adult teeth animation

Tuesday
Dec152009

Decay to abcess...as seen in "X-Rays"

I thought I'd post an intersting animation I made a while back.   I occasionally make animations for educational purposes and you may have seen some on this or other websites I have had in the past.  If you are a patient who sees me at my Oakville practice, you have seen this and other dental education I play on the monitors in my office.
Here you can see a cavity start on a tooth that has no decay to start.  Just beside this tooth you can see two teeth with fillings...they look white.decay to abcess -Xray "movie"
As the decay progresses, it gets larger and deeper in a typical manner, eventually reaching the dark area in the center of the tooth.  This dark area in the center of the tooth is the "hollow" inside of the tooth where the "nerve" or dental pulp is.  The pulp is the living part of the tooth.  When the decay reaches the pulp, the bacteria that has caused the decay (destruction of the hard tooth structure) infects the pulp tissue and it dies.  The dead tissue breaks down and abcesses and on this Xray Animation you see a large round shadow form at root tip.  This dark spot is the breakdown or destruction of bone there by the abcessing nerve tissue. 
As you might guess,  I try to get the cavities when they are small and easy to repair.  Once the decay reaches the nerve, root canal therapy is needed and we want to avoid that.  This is one of the reasons we dentists take radiographs or "X-rays" at check ups... to get the cavities when they are small and easy to fix!